There is power in unity! The People’s Climate March has initially won. Thousand of Earth advocates came and responded to our call.

Soon after the September 21 mobilization, countries from across the globe have started making plans and executing concrete actions that are easier on the environment.

Little by little, we are heading forward…

The invitation…

Let’s make our voices heard!  On Sunday, September 21, let’s  go out of our comfort zone and join the People’s Climate March.  Let’s demand action for a cleaner planet and an economy that works for people.

PCM

This is not an invitation to change everything.  But at least, we, the citizens of planet Earth can make an impact that could swerve the course of history.

As heads of state from around the world meet for a historic summit on climate change, let us also seize the moment to demand action.  Action that may deliver us from the damaging effects of climate change.  UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon even exhorts governments to participate in a global agreement to minimize global warming pollution.

We are aware, however, that a single summit cannot “solve climate change”. But, as a unified and vigilant community, we have the power to organize and confront the power of fossil fuels.

The People’s Climate March is a worldwide activity with the primary purpose of urging heads of governments from all over the world to take concrete action to reduce the impact of climate change.  As these heads of state hold the climate change summit in September 2014, in New York City, we can organize a synchronized movement wherever we may be.

Check the schedule of events in your region or community and sign up.  You may even want to organize an event in your locality, if there is none yet.

Let’s make this weekend a historic event for all mankind.  Our future is on the line here.

By the way, have you ever wondered how much climate change has already claimed of our planet Earth?  Let Kelly Nyks and Jared P. Scott show you the extent of damage and its potential threat in their film, DISRUPTION.   

After the September 21 People’s March…..

We made the largest mobilization ever!

Hundred of thousands join the People’s Climate March in New York and in more than 2,000 communities all over the world to call to action on the threats of climate change.  It’s the largest mobilization ever!

Our concerted effort and solidarity is our initial victory towards building a sustainable society. We have put forward our message of making the governments of the world know that we, the citizens of planet Earth, are seriously concerned about the growing threats of climate change.

As heads of states gather for a summit on the issue, we hope that they come up with concrete and workable plans to resolve the problem of climate change, so that we may translate our initial victory into pursuing concrete actions to save the world by creating a community powered by 100% clean energy.

We shall continue the march towards a sustainable path by building better and healthier climate along the way.

Thank you all for your active participation in the September 21 historic event. Scroll down to see the evidence of our solidarity.

New York, USA
New York, USA
New York, USA
New York, USA
Honolulu, USA
Honolulu, USA
Rio, Brazil
Rio, Brazil
Athens, Greece
Athens, Greece
Barcelona, Spain
Barcelona, Spain
Genoa, Italy
Genoa, Italy
Rome, Italy
Rome, Italy
Berlin, Germany
Berlin, Germany
Munich, Germany
Munich, Germany
Bristol, United Kingdom
Bristol, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdon
London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom
Ottawa, Canada
Ottawa, Canada
Paris, France
Paris, France
Paris, France
Paris, France
Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne, Australia
Sydney, Australia
Sydney, Australia
Bogota, Colombia
Bogota, Colombia
Bogota, Colombia
Bogota, Colombia
Bujumbura, Burundi
Bujumbura, Burundi
Loliondo, Tanzania
Loliondo, Tanzania
Lome, Togo
Lome, Togo
Nairobi, Kenya
Nairobi, Kenya
Wilderness, South Africa
Wilderness, South Africa
Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea
Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Delhi, India
Delhi, India
Delhi, India
Delhi, India
Delhi, India
Delhi, India
Kathmandu, Nepal
Kathmandu, Nepal
Istanbul, Turkey
Istanbul, Turkey
Jakarta, Indonesia
Jakarta, Indonesia
Avaaz Executive Director, Ricken Patel, presents the 2 million-strong petition to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon at the People's Climate March, New York
Avaaz Executive Director, Ricken Patel, presents the 2 million-strong petition to UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon at the People’s Climate March, New York

The results of the summit and the People’s Climate March…..

Our efforts paid off… and we’re moving on!

After the historic September 21 event, we are now beginning to see some progress on Climate Change.  The people power and the summit of leaders have initially produced some victories.  For one, climate change is now in the European agenda.

Meanwhile, one of the most popular malls in the Philippines has launched the world’s largest solar power on its facility.

The SM Supermalls has installed 5,700 solar panels on its North EDSA branch on November 24, 2014.  The system is said to generate 1.5 megawatts of solar energy, covering five percent of the store’s average daily electricity consumption.  This translates to a two million pesos savings per month on the part of the retail giant.

This development will significantly help ease the looming problem that the country’s energy sector has foreseen.  The Energy Department has projected earlier that if the country does not adjust accordingly, the northern part of the Philippines might experience energy shortage of around 300 megawatts to 1,000 megawatts in the summer months of 2015.

Moreover, SM Prime Holdings also promised to launch two similar solar power projects at its SM Dasmarinas and Mall of Asia branches soon.


Senile coconut trees are still economically sound even beyond their fruit-bearing years. It only takes ingenuity to make them useful. Locals in the Asia-Pacific region turn these waste into items that generate extra income for them.

Coconut trees are productive up to 80 years of its life.  Beyond this period, they have to be cut down to make way for high yielding varieties. But instead of leaving them in the fields to rot, the locals in the coconut-growing countries convert them into some useful items.

senile coconut trees

Commercial products from senile coconut trees

Coconut farmers in the Asia-Pacific region know too well that rotten coconut trees are a breeding ground for pests, rodents, and insects – intruders that are unwanted in their farms and homes! And so, to minimize the waste from fallen coconut trees, the locals convert them into some commercially-viable products. Some of the items they have developed include:

Coconut lumber. Coco lumber is now considered a viable alternative to hardwood. Several suppliers and manufacturers are already making this a profitable business as demand for this type of wood continues to grow. It costs much less than the conventional hardwood.

Coconut fiberboard. The spathe, coir, and fronds of a coconut are major components of the coconut fiberboard (CFB). Manufacturers mix these fiber components with shredded wood and Portland cement to come up with some basic construction materials. Particularly, they make bricks, tiles, asbestos, cement hollow blocks, and plywood out of these components.

Charcoal. The coconut trunk and other sawmill residues are found to be a good source of charcoal and for energy. In the Philippines, particularly, the agriculture sector converts the coconut trunk charcoal into briquettes for greater strength and density. There’s now an increasing demand for these briquettes abroad.

senile coconut trees

Broomsticks. The central vein that holds the coconut leaves together is by no means the least useful part of the coconut tree. It’s an efficient cleaning tool. In most Asian households, broomsticks are used to sweep and collect the dried leaves on their yard. It’s also used to remove the cobwebs and other dross. Broomsticks are called by different names in southeast Asia. Indonesians call it sapu lidi. While in the Philippines, it is called walis tingting in Tagalog or silhig in Cebuano.

Usually, the locals make one or two sets of broomsticks for their own use at home. Or, they may produce several bunches of it to sell at the market for additional income.

And with a bit of ingenuity, broomsticks make good Christmas tree, too. In some rural homes in the Philippines, the locals would turn a bunch of broomstick upside down. They meticulously decorate it with whatever comes up to their fancy. And… voila! You’ll be surprised at how the humble broomsticks transform into a beautiful Christmas tree.

senile coconut trees

Palm Sunday fronds. Coconut fronds are most in-demand on Palm Sunday. Catholic believers, particularly in the Philippines, use them for palaspas or decorated palm fronds.

Firewood. Bundles of dried coconut palms are a common sight in rural Philippine markets. The locals use them for firewood.

Food wraps. Aside from its seasonal demand during Lent, the palm fronds are also used to wrap foods. Some regional delicacies in the Philippines are contained in coconut leaves. In the Visayas and Mindanao regions, it’s common to see ready-to-go steamed rice in the market or at the barbecue stands. Locally called puso, this meal is the best match for barbecue and roasted pig (lechon). The locals informally call puso ‘hanging rice’ because they are displayed in the market exactly that way – hanging in bunches!  

Toothpicks and other uses. Did you know that some of the toothpick brands in the market are made of coconut midribs? Not only that! Midribs have also been used as barbecue skewers and brushes. They make beautiful home decors, too.

Novelty items. The brown fiber (guinit or ginit) that wraps around the coconut palms makes a strong material for some novelty items. The locals recycle them into fans, handbags, wooden bakya slipper straps, and many other home decors. In the olden times, helmets and caps were made out of guinit too. Although, these items are rarely seen now, if there is still any, at all.

With a bit of ingenuity, senile coconut trees can still be recycled into some income-generating products. By doing so, we reduce a few carbon footprints.

Would you consider patronizing recycled products from senile coconut trees?

 

Typhoon Yolanda survivors stitch life back up again


typhoon Yolanda
Compassion backpack

Survivors of super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) have started rebuilding their lives. With the help of concerned groups, they sew functional bags for livelihood.

It may have been the worst blow that happened to their lives. But once again, Filipinos show the world how resilient they are! Survivors of super typhoon Yolanda that hit Eastern Visayas in the Philippines on November 8, 2013, have started rebuilding their lives.

While they may never forget the kind hearted souls who were quick to respond to their call for help, these survivors in Tacloban knew they cannot remain dependent on dole-outs forever. They needed something that could sustain them throughout their lives. They need a livelihood.

Typhoon Yolanda survivors sew functional backpacks

And so, with the help of young patriots from various sectors in the country, they decided to venture into sewing for commercial purpose.  They choose to sew functional backpacks. The concept behind the making of these bags is to create a disaster-resilient industry against an economy of dependency for survivors. The local government’s Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) also extended additional technical skills training to them.

Survivors purposely call their bags Compassion since it calls for our continued support. By purchasing this bag, you will greatly help them rebuild their lives. And you will not regret getting it. Each of the distinctively identifiable bright red backpacks is 50% upcycled and made of these components:

  • the outer cover is made of high-grade Japanese truck tarpaulins
  • its inner lining is made of pre-loved jeans
  • it uses military-grade nylon thread for all stitching
  • each bag is sealed with genuine YKK zippers
  • it bears stylish leather lash tabs
  • its large inner pocket snugly fits a 13″ Macbook or any standard folder
  • its jean pockets can store the things you would normally have to keep in a pocket
  • it’s weather-resistant

typhoon Yolanda

Since its introduction to the market, Compassion instantly gained significant patronage. Some of the first to purchase the bag include artists, celebrities, designers, chefs, athletes, and social workers. And so far, the response from the public is overwhelming. In fact, each Compassion has now become a badge.

For purchasing the bag and for more information about Compassion, you may contact Taclob directly.

 

Get Compassion and give more…

For every Compassion backpack purchased, you help create jobs for the Yolanda survivors. You also get to support an eco-friendly and upcycled design. But most importantly, you will have the opportunity to help the children survivors cope up with the trauma of typhoon Yolanda.

Courage: keeping Yolanda children survivors afloat


When you buy a Compassion bag, you give a multi-functional school bag to a typhoon child survivor.

Courage
Courage bag

Survivors of super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan), which hit the Eastern Visayas part of the Philippines, are determined to get back on their feet again.  With the assistance of compatriots and leading bag makers in the country, they start rebuilding their lives by sewing weather-resistant backpacks for commercial purposes.  The good thing about it is that not only do they aim to establish an income-generating project.  Survivors also keep survival preparedness in mind.

Along with the iconic bright red Compassion bags, they also make backpacks cum flotation device designed to equip young children in case something like Yolanda happens again.  Aptly called Courage, the bag aims to provide children a fighting chance in case of emergency.  It is also meant to help address a deep emotional trauma of uncertainty that still haunts children survivors to this day.

Get Compassion and give more…

A Courage bag is given to a child survivor every time you buy a Compassion backpack for yourself or as a gift item for someone else. Each Courage bag, which contains art materials and school supplies, has these features:

  • constructed with high-density, water-resistant nylon fabric
  • double stitched with military-grade nylon thread to ensure longevity
  • reflective striping on the front and back to enhance visibility at night or during search and rescue operations
  • utilizes two empty 2-liter PET bottles strapped to the side of the bag to keep a child afloat

Watch the video and see how Courage works.

Survivors who sew both Compassion and Courage got additional technical skills training from TESDA  (Technical Education and Skills Development Authority).

For details on how to help children survivors and purchase Compassion bags, please do visit Taclob.

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